The Tortex Picks line just got the perfect pick shape for modern shredders. We borrowed the geometry of our Flow Pick, which was specifically designed to keep up with and complement the advanced technique of today’s most skilled players. To create the Flow Pick, we took a recently rediscovered pick design and used high-precision molding to add an enhanced beveled edge and a low-profile grip to capitalize on the control, precision, and articulation provided by its small profile, wide angle, and sharp tip. It has everything that players need to get to the next note with ease and speed.

Knowing how to set up and maintain your instrument is an important way to become more intimate not only with the instrument itself but also your sound and playing style. Any player can do it—all you need is the right tools for the job. We can help you out with that.

Our System 65 Tools offer just about everything a guitar or bass player needs for his work bench and gig bag. Whether you need to adjust something on the fly or have the time for a full setup, these tools will help you keep your instruments playing their best. Let’s take a quick setup tour to see just how helpful they can be.

First, you need a proper workspace. The System 65 Setup Mat makes for the perfect surface, as its made from no-mar neoprene with thick padding to protect your instrument. Next, you’ll need the Neck Cradle to prop up your instrument. Also padded with no-mar neoprene, the Neck Cradle rotates to provide full support to the back or front of your instrument’s neck and can accomodate a wide range of thicknesses. If you’re removing any parts, the Magnetic Parts Tray is a lifesaver to make sure you don’t lose any nuts or screws. For backstage maintenance and repairs, the System 65 Gig Light is an absolute necessity, featuring a beam that’s bright enough to be seen from up to 100 yards away, and it’s waterproof, so you don’t have worry about the odd beverage spilling on it.

The MXR Carbon Copy Analog Delay first hit pedalboards in 2008, captivating guitar players the world over with its rich bucket-brigade warmth and elegant simplicity. Today, it’s the go-to standard for players who want a well-rounded, easy-to-use delay pedal that sounds incredible.

Since then, the Carbon Copy name has practically developed into a sub-brand of its own. In 2015, we released the Carbon Copy Bright Analog Delay, a limited edition pedal that gave players all the functionality of the original but with a brighter sound. In 2017, we released the Carbon Copy Deluxe Analog Delay for those players who love the sound and user-interface of the original but want to exercise more control over their Carbon Copy Delay experience with more options for tone and performance. The year 2019 sees another join the fold in the form of the Carbon Copy Mini Analog Delay. It’s a must-have for players who need more freedom over their pedalboard real estate.

That makes three Carbon Copy Delays currently on offer, so you might be wondering which one is right for your needs as a player.

Let’s find out.

Shin Suzuki is the most celebrated amp and pedal designer in Japan, renowned by tonechasers the world over for his ability to faithfully recreate some of the most elusive sounds in music history. As proprietor of Shin’s Music in Tokyo, he has cultivated an unfailing ear for incredible tones. In 2016, Shin collaborated with the MXR Custom Shop to create the Shin-Juku™ Drive, a pedal widely praised for the way it captured the raw sonic complexity of a rare amplifier with a legendary reputation.

Shin and the MXR Custom Shop have come together once again to create the MXR Raijin Drive, a pedal that reinvents two iconic Japanese stompboxes—an overdrive and a distortion—with greater tonal range and usability so that those beloved sounds can keep up with the modern tone chase.

We sat down with Shin to talk about this new creation, what inspired him to design pedals, and more.

Despite the overwhelming consensus that compressors are one of the most indispensable studio tools, compressor pedals can be one of the most misunderstood effects. Some players swear by them, others avoid them. But if you need sustain without distortion or want to tame aggressive peaks and even out dynamics, a good compressor is the ticket. And when guitarists think about compressor pedals, they think about a little red box called the MXR® Dyna Comp® Compressor.

Released in 1972, the Dyna Comp Compressor featured simple, straightforward controls—labeled Output and Sensitivity—to govern the volume and compression levels, respectively. Inside, it contained the coveted CA3080 metal can integrated circuit, which remains a key component to its sound and vibe.