MXR and innovation have been synonymous in the world of effects pedals ever since the Phase 90 first the market in the early 1970s. The driving force behind the MXR design team has always been a commitment to discovering new ways for musicians to express themselves with reliable gear that’s straightforward and simple to use.


The MXR Carbon Copy Analog Delay first hit pedalboards in 2008, captivating guitar players the world over with its rich bucket-brigade warmth and elegant simplicity. Today, it’s the go-to standard for players who want a well-rounded, easy-to-use delay pedal that sounds incredible.

Since then, the Carbon Copy name has practically developed into a sub-brand of its own. In 2015, we released the Carbon Copy Bright Analog Delay, a limited edition pedal that gave players all the functionality of the original but with a brighter sound. In 2017, we released the Carbon Copy Deluxe Analog Delay for those players who love the sound and user-interface of the original but want to exercise more control over their Carbon Copy Delay experience with more options for tone and performance. The year 2019 sees another join the fold in the form of the Carbon Copy Mini Analog Delay. It’s a must-have for players who need more freedom over their pedalboard real estate.

That makes three Carbon Copy Delays currently on offer, so you might be wondering which one is right for your needs as a player.

Let’s find out.

Shin Suzuki is the most celebrated amp and pedal designer in Japan, renowned by tonechasers the world over for his ability to faithfully recreate some of the most elusive sounds in music history. As proprietor of Shin’s Music in Tokyo, he has cultivated an unfailing ear for incredible tones. In 2016, Shin collaborated with the MXR Custom Shop to create the Shin-Juku™ Drive, a pedal widely praised for the way it captured the raw sonic complexity of a rare amplifier with a legendary reputation.

Shin and the MXR Custom Shop have come together once again to create the MXR Raijin Drive, a pedal that reinvents two iconic Japanese stompboxes—an overdrive and a distortion—with greater tonal range and usability so that those beloved sounds can keep up with the modern tone chase.

We sat down with Shin to talk about this new creation, what inspired him to design pedals, and more.

Despite the overwhelming consensus that compressors are one of the most indispensable studio tools, compressor pedals can be one of the most misunderstood effects. Some players swear by them, others avoid them. But if you need sustain without distortion or want to tame aggressive peaks and even out dynamics, a good compressor is the ticket. And when guitarists think about compressor pedals, they think about a little red box called the MXR® Dyna Comp® Compressor.

Released in 1972, the Dyna Comp Compressor featured simple, straightforward controls—labeled Output and Sensitivity—to govern the volume and compression levels, respectively. Inside, it contained the coveted CA3080 metal can integrated circuit, which remains a key component to its sound and vibe.

In 1967, the Jimi Hendrix Experience made its first major American appearance at the legendary Monterey Pop Festival. Jimi Hendrix demonstrated his almost supernatural mastery of the electric guitar, punctuating the performance by setting his guitar on fire, swinging it wildly around and smashing it on the stage floor. Hendrix had issued a manifesto in music form, ushering in the modern age of the electric guitarist.

His creative use of the tools at his disposal set a precedent for tone crafting and sonic texturing that countless numbers of players continue to pursue today. Hendrix was able to vary his tones in seemingly endless ways that fail to sound dated decades later. With equal parts sonic braggadocio and understated elegance, Hendrix used his hands, his instrument, his effects, and most importantly his ears to concoct a brilliant synergy of sound and song rarely, if ever, equaled.

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Hendrix’s Monterey performance, we’ve created a special edition run of his favorite effects featuring iconic imagery from legendary rock ‘n’ roll photographer Gered Mankowitz. Below we take a look at how Hendrix used those effects to change the face of music forever.